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Thread: How quickly does coffee go off?

  1. #1
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    How quickly does coffee go off?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi,

    My brew yesterday seemed fine but today I couldn't drink it. Is that unusual?
    My wife and I both found it very weak, so made a new brew more carefully, but same result.
    I would complain if I got that in a shop.

    Emptied out the beans from the grinder cleaned out everything, reloaded beans from the tin and tried again, but no good.
    The pour looks reasonable but no taste, beans smell fine.
    I suspect beans have just reached their use-by date, but thought they would gradually degrade, no so fast.

    What have home brew people found?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    What beans are you using and how old are they? Or at least how long ago did you buy them?

    Have you adjusted the grind? I'd typically adjust the grind slightly finer (or dose slightly higher) as beans age.

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Beans kept in a tin sounds like part of the cause... the more air you store with the beans the faster they will stale.
    We send beans in 1 way valve bags and squeezing the air out will help with a longer shelf life.

    How old are the beans you are using? (ie: when were they roasted?)

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Snap Barry... I need to type faster!

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Snap Barry... I need to type faster!
    And I'm in a room full of paint fumes.......though your fine Costa Rican is countering that effect.

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    As rough guide green beans are ok for about 3 years, brown beans are fresh for about 3 weeks while ground coffee is best used within about 3 minutes.

    Only buy roasted coffee from where they can tell you when they were roasted and use it from about one week to about three weeks after roasting. Don’t go by a use-by date which in a supermarket may be anything up to two years after roasting, by when it is only suitable as a garden mulch.

    I like many others here roast my own, so I always have fresh coffee beans.

    Barry
    Last edited by Barry_Duncan; 11th June 2013 at 05:27 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    What beans are you using and how old are they? Or at least how long ago did you buy them?

    Have you adjusted the grind? I'd typically adjust the grind slightly finer (or dose slightly higher) as beans age.

    Thanks for the comment,
    I have been using Toraja beans, we like the mild taste. I didn't think they were all that old, but we had been away for a week, so probably had not used them as up as quickly as normal. I think perhaps 3 weeks.

    Yes I did try tweeking the dose and grind a little. Adjusting the grind means they pack down a bit more so need to tweek the dose a little as well.

    Just dumped the remaining beans and got a new batch, changed the water and tried some different milk. The coffee today tasted fine so perhaps it was the beans. Always hard to say if some days your taste buds are not working so well, but both of us were of the same opinion.

    I have some of those Vittoria coffee tins you see in the supermarkets. Seem like they should be okay for beans, they have some type of lining on the inside. What is the general view of this type of storage compared to the plastic bags the beans are packed in?

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    FWIW, I have a 'VacuVin' -- little box thing that you can evacuate the air from (similar to those things you can get for wine bottles). Keep all the coffee not in the grinder hopper in it -- we go through the hopper in about a week, then have the VacuVin to refill the hopper.

    It keeps it fresher much longer than my old method of airtight box in dark/cool place...no idea if that's just psychological though!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    I've tried the Vacuvin and the Fries tin, but at the end of the day, ziplock bags with a one way bag seem to do a better job. The valve allows recently roasted beans to de-gas, and as you use the bag up, you just squeeze as much excess air out of the bag as possible before re-sealing. I re-use them several times (just let hot soapy water soak in them, rinse then give them a wash before you do the dishes, then rinse again).

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    A freezer bag inside a one-way-valve bag works too. Freezer bags are cheap, and no washing up!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    What beans are you using and how old are they? Or at least how long ago did you buy them?

    Have you adjusted the grind? I'd typically adjust the grind slightly finer (or dose slightly higher) as beans age.
    Just found out I can do that on the Breville grinder ( Model number I forget 'cos I'm a blonde). Made such a difference.
    Guess I should have read the instruction manual
    Last edited by GreenBeanGenii; 13th June 2013 at 10:54 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    I've tried the Vacuvin and the Fries tin, but at the end of the day, ziplock bags with a one way bag seem to do a better job. T.
    Thanks for the comments.
    Sounds like it is worth changing my storage. I did try the hand pump vacuum bags but found the seals less than perfect and once used they became unreliable. Big risk.
    Some people say don't freeze beans because you get condensation but if you sucked out the air first then let return to room temperature before opening there is no way moisture could get in.
    I assume you can get these bags with the valves in them from the supermarkets.

  13. #13
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutfarmer View Post
    I assume you can get these bags with the valves in them from the supermarkets.
    I get mine from where I buy coffee--including the Bean Bay.

    Line them with a freezer bag and the'll last for a good number of batches.

    Greg

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregWormald View Post
    I get mine from where I buy coffee--including the Bean Bay.

    Greg
    Thanks Greg, will have a look around or order from Andy.



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