Results 1 to 23 of 23
Like Tree4Likes
  • 4 Post By fatboy_1999

Thread: BBQ roaster - general info

  1. #1
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130

    BBQ roaster - general info

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I recently received a PM asking for some info about my setup.
    Unfortunately, I am one of a few users who cannot reply to PM's due to a system bug.

    So, I thought I would post my word document here once more as the old post from years ago seems to have a broken link.

    Hope this is useful to someone!

    Brett.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    TOK
    TOK is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    697
    In a previous life my CS profile suffered a similar fate to you with the "PM bug", and I understand how frustrating that can be...

    That's a nice little set up. Well done.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by fatboy_1999 View Post
    I recently received a PM asking for some info about my setup.
    Unfortunately, I am one of a few users who cannot reply to PM's due to a system bug.

    So, I thought I would post my word document here once more as the old post from years ago seems to have a broken link.

    Hope this is useful to someone!

    Brett.
    Hi Brett
    It was me, and I thank you very much for taking the time!
    Toying with some ideas at present with designing a drum roaster for the BBQ. Know someone who is very handy with metal/stainless steel. We shall see how it goes.
    Rob

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Hills District
    Posts
    142
    Hey, Fatboy that is brilliant.

    If you don't mind me asking, What are the drum diameters and lengths etc.

    I love the ingenuity around here!

    RC

  5. #5
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    It's 200mm diameter x 310mm long. Purchased from a USA specialty home roaster supplier.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Hills District
    Posts
    142
    Thanks for the reply as it really helps me to get some perspective. It looks like a really great setup and very inventive.

    I love the things people come up with.

  7. #7
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    It's done a pretty good job for around 13 years. I dread the day my motor dies. I got a backup a few years back but it doesn't have the same torque. I guess I will have to buy a proper one when it carks.
    Belted out another 2 roasts today

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Hills District
    Posts
    142
    Would one of those barbecues with the rotisseries work of do they turn too slowly?

    I am trying to get my head around it all as I have a Baby roaster that works really well and a Corretto but looking to the future

    I would like to get something which does bigger batches without having to spend big dollars (only because I don't have them big $$$$).

    RC

  9. #9
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    I've never tried one, but I think the slow rotisserie motors wouldn't cut it for roasting. They are usually around 3 rpm.
    My wiper motor was around 55rpm when I got it. It has slowed down to around 45rpm over the years, but given its workload, I think it has done a stellar job.
    My backup motor works fine for my original (1kg) drum, but cannot handle the 2kg drum. So depending on the capacity you are wanting to turn, you will need to work out the torque required and see if you can source an appropriate motor.
    There are items on various sale sites called 'wondermotor' which look amazingly like a wiper motor, but seem to have an actual torque rating, so they might be worth looking at.

    I did try to figure out my torque requirement a little while back but got somewhat sidetracked. I'd like a simple "Can handle 5kgs" rating, but torque isn't as simple as that according to all the calculation sites I ended up at.

    Good luck.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Hills District
    Posts
    142
    Thanks ,but I am not the sort of guy who could work out torque if it was telling me the equation of the meaning of life, to which I believe incidentally the answer to be 42.

    But thanks for your on going input as it sort of helps me in the idiot disposition in which I find myself stumbling about.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    37
    Hi all
    Would a convection function on a home BBQ improve the roast quality? Also, any ideas on how to ventilate to collect the chaff while roasting?

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenscroft View Post
    Thanks ,but I am not the sort of guy who could work out torque if it was telling me the equation of the meaning of life, to which I believe incidentally the answer to be 42.

    But thanks for your on going input as it sort of helps me in the idiot disposition in which I find myself stumbling about.
    Torque is a linear equation - so a simple division/multiplication calculation. Expressed as kgf.cm (kilogram force per cm) or Nm (Newton meter) - conversion calculators are your friend. The only difficult bit is calculating what % of your roast is contributing to the torque - depends on size of any vanes, drum material, drum orientation etc. - it's not the whole weight of your roast. The torque required is that weight in kg multiplied by the distance from the axis in cm.

    I recently replaced the drill that was running my roaster with a 13kgf.cm 50rpm 12V geared motor bought off evilbay - future proofed in case I want to build a bigger drum. The torque I needed was only about 0.8kgf.cm for a 300g roast in a 16cm drum.

  13. #13
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    Improve the roast quality from what?

    I think putting it a convection oven would decrease your control and visibility.

    And unless you had very good quality exhaust ventilation for your oven, it would be a no go in my book. Too much smoke is produced during the roasting process.

    As for the chaff, well that's a whole other problem. Purpose built roasters like the Behmor have a chaff collector, but once you start looking to roast bigger batches, you get bigger amounts of chaff.

    If you are roasting in a drum, then it will retain a significant amount of the chaff.

    Some will burn off during the roast, but I find the bulk of it is blown off the beans after I dump them into the cooler.

    And of course, some beans produce much more chaff than others.

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Sydney Inner West
    Posts
    20
    At the risk of getting a very general answer back, may I ask how well the RK drum and BBQ setup does in terms of quality of beans roasted? What ends up in the cup? Or what can you do once you learn how to roast on such a setup? I imagine it is largely down to the user? Any thoughts are welcome. Thanks

  15. #15
    Senior Member noonar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    MortalCoil
    Posts
    490
    Genaeral Answer here... Coretto.

  16. #16
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    @Aaron4820 - I think the BBQ drum roasts as well as any of the other main methods.
    I find I have pretty good control, but then again I have been doing it for around 13 years.
    The only down side I can see is if you wish to use the roast monitor software and temperature probe, then the drum does not lend itself to an easy solution for getting the temperature probe into the bean mass, whereas a Coretto and Behmor does.

    For whatever it's worth, I won a couple of bronze medals at the last Golden Bean with my BBQ roasts.

    Brett.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Sydney Inner West
    Posts
    20
    Thanks for that - that's great getting bronze medal. What sort of roast times to 1st and 2nd crack do you generally get (for arguments sake, say for a small hard African bean or a large green Colombian bean?) Can you roast beans on the lighter side (my preference) in a way that retains brightness whilst still highlighting a beans individual flavour? Thanks again.

    PS. I was contemplating buying an RK drum for use in the gas BBQ. But I have been unsure whether the results would be worth the outlay. I appreciate your thoughts.

  18. #18
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    I usually roast around 1875g green. Yields around 1500g roasted.
    Roast times - Depending on the bean and other factors like the weather (as I am outside), 1st crack between 14m and 17m mark, 2nd crack between 16m and 19m mark.
    Very rare for my roast to go past the 20 minute mark these days.
    I roast most beans to just on 2nd crack. I don't personally do a lot of lighter roasts, but as long as your BBQ heat source is quickly adjustable, then I see no reason why you cannot control the profile quite closely.
    The important thing is to take notes.

    My main learning curve on the BBQ has been handling the thermal mass. When I went to the larger drum, I had a few roasts run away from me (1st crack pretty much right into 2nd) as I was not reducing the heat early enough and the heat within the beans took things along faster than I wanted.
    I have got a handle on that these days - basically I reduce heat to low on all burners when 1st crack begins and the roast will progress to 2nd with little further intervention.

    There are also some roasting styles or methods that you can look at. EG: Ramping up the heat to full again shortly prior to finishing the roast.
    There are some training courses out there that you can take that explain profiling and other aspects of roasting in more detail - could be worth looking into that.

    Was the RK drum worth the outlay? To me it certainly was. I'm more than happy with my results, and there are a few family members and friends who also seem pretty content with my output.

    Brett.

  19. #19
    Senior Member brettreaby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    267
    just wondering how you dump the beans: still on the rotisserie rod? i would have thought everything would be pretty hot and you have to be careful?

  20. #20
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,130
    The rod I use extends out about 500mm longer than the BBQ, so one end of the rod is not hot when ready to dump beans.
    For the other part of the rod, I have a welding glove with some extra heat resistant material added (cut up another glove and sewed it on top basically).
    The drum has a spring latch that is fairly easy to flip up with the glove on.
    So my dumping process is:
    Start both my bean coolers up (ceiling fans in white plastic tubs with mesh sieves on top).
    Lift BBQ lid.
    Remove motor from rod.
    Undo latch.
    Grab both ends of rotisserie rod - making sure to have the glove on the correct hand!
    Dump half roast into cooler 1
    Dump the other half into cooler 2
    Return rotisserie to BBQ - ready for next roast or to cool down for packing up.
    Stir beans in coolers with wooden spoon.
    When the beans are cool enough, I take them into the shed for bagging.

    Yes, you need to be careful, but thus far I have only had 1 'medium' incident and a few very minor ones.
    Medium incident was setting fire to a roast in the early days. Got distracted and had to hose down the drum and lose the beans.
    Minor incidents are spillages. Sometimes on load, sometimes on dump, but never too bad.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Hills District
    Posts
    142
    Thanks for all your time on this Fatboy, very educational and very inspiring.

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Sydney Inner West
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenscroft View Post
    Thanks for all your time on this Fatboy, very educational and very inspiring.
    I second this.

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    37
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenscroft View Post
    Thanks for all your time on this Fatboy, very educational and very inspiring.
    Thanks Brett



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •